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Compassionate Health Care Thrives


paperfree Peter Flierl

Updated on Friday, April 28, 2017

Olaye observed that health care has changed dramatically in the past decade. The economic crash has driven some individuals into health care careers for the perceived security...

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Olaye observed that health care has changed dramatically in the past decade. The economic crash has driven some individuals into health care careers for the perceived security


Osaylande Olaye, RRT brings empathy, caring, and compassion to patients of Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center in his role as Director of its Respiratory Care Department. That level of care is present whether he is at the bedside or one of his respiratory technicians.

Olaye’s father was less than industrious and a minimalist provider. Olaye, the oldest of 5 brothers, was the natural leader and provider in his family of origin in Nigeria. He immigrated to the United States in 1977 and brought with him his leadership skills and passion for a better life. He chose America as it was the most stable, democratic, and capitalist country in the world. He believed it would provide him the opportunity he sought to build a better life.

Olaye graduated from Westchester Community College in 2000. When you spend a few minutes with him in his office, you appreciate the volume of work he faces daily. Each of his 3 smartphones and a walkie-talkie came into play during our visit, as did several people stopping by for an assist, a consultation, or other necessities of serving patients in a busy metropolitan hospital.
Olaye observed that health care has changed dramatically in the past decade. The economic crash has driven some individuals into health care careers for the perceived security. A few have a punch in, punch out mentality.  
Olaye works closely with his staff to nurture an understanding that making a difference in another person’s life, making that life better and easier, is the true reward for healthcare workers. It is not the money. There is nothing more gratifying, no better feeling, than seeing you personally had an impact.

 

Photo: Osaylande Olaye

 

The balance of professional and personal life seems to come naturally. Olaye delegates and uses a management model that is a circle versus top down. He thrived and came alive with patients at their bedside as a clinician, and was encouraged to grow. He helps his staff become independent and understand that each of them is responsible for their own happiness. There are no stupid questions on his watch, nor judgments.

 
Balance of professional and personal life seems to come naturally

We were pleased to hear that Westchester Community College will have a clinical rotation at Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center later this year.

 



This page with a focus on healthcare, was shared by Peter Flierl.

 
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